Robert “Bob” Braidwood Sim Memorial Symposium

On April 9, 2022, Svar was honored to contribute to and participate in the memorial symposium of Professor Robert Braidwood Sim – known amongst friends as Bob Sim, who passed away last year. The Following are a few reflections from this meeting.

Bob spent almost half a century working in the complement field. From his great academic research to the love and respect shown to him by his colleagues, friends, and students – it is easy to see that he was not only a great scientist with a love for the complement system but also a great inspiration to other scientists, to whom he gave support regardless of their field of study.

Robert “Bob” Braidwood Sim Memorial Symposium

On April 9, 2022, Svar was honored to contribute to and participate in the memorial symposium of Professor Robert Braidwood Sim – known amongst friends as Bob Sim, who passed away last year. The Following are a few reflections from this meeting.

Bob spent almost half a century working in the complement field. From his great academic research to the love and respect shown to him by his colleagues, friends, and students – it is easy to see that he was not only a great scientist with a love for the complement system but also a great inspiration to other scientists, to whom he gave support regardless of their field of study.

Bob entered the complement world in 1973 as a D.Phil. student at Oxford University working with C1. After completing his D.Phil., he continued his work in Grenoble before returning to Oxford to lead a research group at the MRC Immunochemistry Unit. There he stayed until the unit was discontinued in 2008. Bob dedicated his entire academic career to understanding the complement system, mainly focusing on C1, C3, and Factor H.

Apart from his academic achievements, what was most striking during his memorial symposium was the love and respect he obtained on the way. From the accounts of his former students and network, Bob did his utmost to inspire and support students, colleagues, and collaborators in their scientific journeys. The speakers at the symposium all painted a picture of a person that was always willing to give his time and knowledge to those who would reach out to him.

Throughout his career, he produced hundreds of publications and guided and supported numerous Ph.D. students and guest researchers, and through this, he has left behind a legacy that will be remembered for a long time.

Our condolences to his wife, Edith Sim, their children, and loved ones.

You can follow the link below to read more about Bob Sim, his life, and his contribution to the world of complement.